Online Accessibility Training

What Are Accessibility Tools Used by People with Low Vision?

People who are blind or visually impaired can use a variety of tools to access meaning in art. For this tutorial, we have divided the tools into two types: Learning Tools and General Accessibility Tools. In this tutorial we define each tool and offer examples, practical considerations, and resources.

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Accessibility Advice for Museums from Dr. Betsy A. Zaborowski, Executive Director, Jernigan Institute, National Federation of the Blind (2:12)

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Learning Tools. These provide access to exhibition content and meaning, or to the art experience.

  1. Touch Tours and other Tactile Experiences
  2. Tactile Diagrams with Verbal Guidance of Hands
  3. Verbal Description
  4. Sound and Drama
  5. Art Making
  6. Educational Extensions

General Accessibility Tools. These provide access to facilities and information media.

  1. Universal Design (Human-Centered Design)
  2. Braille and Large Print
  3. Tactile Graphics and Maps
  4. Audio Described Media
  5. Accessible Web Materials

Learning and General Accessibility tools have multiple uses:

  • Upon entering the museum: tactile maps, brochures and materials in braille and large print.
  • In the galleries: audio guides, art-making activities, verbal-description tours, labels and text in braille and large print, tactile experiences and touch tours.
  • In the education center: brochures and materials in braille and large print, tactile maps, audio-descriptive videos, curriculum integration activities, art-making activities, verbal description, tactile experiences and touch sessions, accessible Web materials.
  • In classrooms and schools: brochures and materials in braille and large print, tactile maps, audio-descriptive videos, curriculum integration activities, art-making activities, verbal description, tactile experiences and touch sessions, accessible Web materials.

Remember: These tools, designed for people who are blind or visually impaired, will benefit others too—people with different learning styles, or who may access information better tactilely or aurally, or who have difficulty accessing traditional print materials.

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Online Training
How do We Access Meaning in Art?
  What Are Accessibility Tools?
  Theory and Research
  Learning Tools
  Touch Tools
    Tactile Diagrams
    Verbal Description
    Sound and Drama
    Art Making
    Educational Extensions
  General Tools
    Universal Design
    Braille and Large Print
    Tactile Graphics
    Audio Described Media
    Accessible Web Materials
  Next Steps
  Beyond Accessibility
  Resources
  Network
  Technical Help
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